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Comparative Theology

Mystical Traditions in Comparative Perspective: Session Three - Christian mystical traditions 1 ‚ The Relevance of Christian Mysticism

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Oliver Davies
Date: 
Friday, February 12, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

Mysticism is a term that has fallen out of use in recent years, partly due to the critique of essentialism in the history of religions, partly due to the recognition that mysticism is particular to tradition and culture and partly due to the orientation to understand religion in terms of a politics of culture that sees religion purely in constructivist terms.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Oliver

Mystical Traditions in Comparative Perspective: Session Five - The Jewish Roots of Christian Mysticism

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Guy Stroumsa
Date: 
Friday, March 5, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

Mysticism is a term that has fallen out of use in recent years, partly due to the critique of essentialism in the history of religions, partly due to the recognition that mysticism is particular to tradition and culture and partly due to the orientation to understand religion in terms of a politics of culture that sees religion purely in constructivist terms.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Guy

Mystical Traditions in Comparative Perspective: Session One - Islamic mystical traditions‚ Sufis in India

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Talib Muhammad
Date: 
Friday, January 29, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

Mysticism is a term that has fallen out of use in recent years, partly due to the critique of essentialism in the history of religions, partly due to the recognition that mysticism is particular to tradition and culture and partly due to the orientation to understand religion in terms of a politics of culture that sees religion purely in constructivist terms.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Talib

Comparative Mysticism Seminar 2: Tasting God: The Ascetical and Mystical Theology of Rupa Gosvami

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
Date: 
Friday, November 5, 2010 -
14:00 to 15:30
Location: 
OCHS Library

This seminar explores Jiva Gosvamin’s theology and raises the question of whether he could be described as a mystic.

 
Dr Lutjeharms holds undergraduate and graduate degrees in Oriental Studies (Indology) from the University of Ghent, Belgium and a DPhil from the University of Oxford (Theology). His DPhil was on the poet and theologian Kavikarnapura.
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Rembert

Comparative Mysticism Seminar 3: Unsayability and Meditative Ascent in Esoteric Hindu Traditions

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin Flood
Date: 
Friday, November 19, 2010 -
14:00 to 15:30
Location: 
OCHS Library

In this seminar we examine two tendencies or spiritual languages in esoteric medieval Hindu traditions. On the one hand we have a style of mysticism that emphasizes a realisation or awakening in the world, usually accompanied by a monistic metaphysics, on the other we have a style and language of meditative ascent; that there is a journey from this world to the state of liberation through stages of development, often conceptualized as occurring within the body. The seminar will examine these tendencies with reference to particular texts. 

 
Gavin Flood is academic director of OCHS.
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin

Comparative Mysticism Seminar 1: Flowing Milk. A Lost Meditation, Tradition from the Silk Road

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Lance Cousins
Date: 
Friday, October 22, 2010 -
14:00 to 15:30
Location: 
OCHS Library

This lecture examines a Buddhist meditation tradition exemplified particularly by visualisation text from central Asia. This is a seminar in our series on Comparative Mystical Traditions.

 
Lance Cousins is an expert in Buddhism, particularly the Theravada tradition and Pali commentarial literature, and Buddhist meditation traditions. He taught for many years at the University of Manchester where, among other things, he taught a course in comparative mysticism.
First name (inc. titles): 
Lance

Mystical Traditions in Comparative Perspective: Session Four - Christian mystical traditions 2 ‚ Understanding Apophaticism

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor George Pattison
Date: 
Friday, February 19, 2010 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

Mysticism is a term that has fallen out of use in recent years, partly due to the critique of essentialism in the history of religions, partly due to the recognition that mysticism is particular to tradition and culture and partly due to the orientation to understand religion in terms of a politics of culture that sees religion purely in constructivist terms.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor George

Radical Monotheism of the Qur’an and Equitheism of the Bhagavata Purana: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Allah and Krishna

Lecture Type: 
Wahlstrom Lecture
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Carl Olson
Date: 
Monday, May 17, 2010 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

This narrowly focused essay proposes to compare the Islamic god Allah as depicted in the Qur’an with the Hindu deity Krishna in the Bhagavata Purana. This paper concentrates on how these two respective texts define the two deities. More precisely, this essay focuses on such issues as transcendence and immanence, creative power and play, obedience and love, and the relationship between God and humans.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Carl

Comparative Theology in Global Perspective

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Keith Ward
Date: 
Monday, May 10, 2010 -
14:00 to 15:30
Location: 
OCHS Library

Professor Keith Ward has developed comparative theology and religion in many of his publications over the years. He is particularly interested in comparative theology, the dialogue between religions and the interplay between science and faith. Keith has had a renowned and rich academic career; he taught at Glasgow, St Andrews, London, he was Dean of Trinity Hall, Cambridge, he was the F.D. Maurice Professor of Moral and Social Theology at the University of London, Professor of History and Philosophy of Religion at King’s College London, and Regius Professor of Divinity at Oxford.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Keith

Naming the divine: A History of the Concept of God

Lecture Type: 
God Across Cultures
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Philip Kennedy
Date: 
Monday, February 28, 2011 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

Wittgenstein once asked, ‘How do I know that two people mean the same when each says he believes in God?’ This seminar will respond to Wittgenstein’s query by sketching the history of the noun ‘God’, and illustrating how, over time, the noun has accrued some strikingly different meanings.

 
Dr Philip Kennedy is fellow of Mansfield College and Lecturer in Theology in the Theology Faculty. He is author of A Modern Introduction to Theology: New Questions for Old Beliefs. London: I.B. Tauris, 2006; ‘God and Creation’, in Mary Catherine Hilkert and Robert J.
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Philip

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