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Yoga

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 3: Yoga-sutras of Patanjali

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin Flood
Date: 
Wednesday, February 4, 2009 - 11:00
Location: 
Theology Faculty Seminar Room

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 4: Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin Flood
Date: 
Wednesday, February 11, 2009 - 11:00
Location: 
Theology Faculty Seminar Room

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin

Earrings and Horns: Locating the first Naths

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr James Mallinson
Date: 
Thursday, May 28, 2009 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

The Naths are ubiquitous in secondary literature on the religious culture of India during the last millennium, but they are very elusive in primary sources. This seminar will trace the development of the traits that set the Naths apart from other religious orders and try to pinpoint when they came together.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr James

Siddhas, Munis and Yogins but no Naths: The Early History of Hathayoga

Lecture Type: 
Wahlstrom Lecture
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr James Mallinson
Date: 
Tuesday, May 19, 2009 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

The Nath order has long been credited with being the originators of hatha-yoga and the authors of the Sanskrit texts on its practice. Text critical study of those works and research into other sources for the same period show this not to be the case: not one of the twenty Sanskrit texts that make up the corpus of early (pre-1450 CE) works on hatha-yoga was written in a Nath milieu. Furthermore, no single sect can be credited with starting hatha-yoga.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr James

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 7: Liberation through Yoga

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin Flood
Date: 
Wednesday, November 24, 2010 -
11:00 to 12:00
Location: 
Theology Faculty Seminar Room

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin

Yoga and Māyā in the Bhāgavata-purāṇa

Lecture Type: 
Graduate Seminar
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Gopal Gupta
Date: 
Thursday, February 3, 2011 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

Among Puranic literature, the Bhagavata Purana has been most influential, both in intellectual circles and in popular Hinduism. The Bhagavata offers a unique form of yoga that is indebted to earlier texts, such as the Mahabharata and Patañjali’s Yoga-sutra, but is nevertheless distinct from them in an important way—the Bhagavata blends its characteristic emotional bhakti with the otherwise staid practice of yoga. This paper argues that the shift from the normative bhakti of the Mahabharata to the emotional bhakti of the Bhagavata is made possible primarily through the concept of yoga-maya.

First name (inc. titles): 
Gopal

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