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Yoga

Yeats and the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali: The Poet as Orientalist

Lecture Type: 
Graduate Seminar
Full Name (inc. titles): 
W. David Soud
Date: 
Thursday, January 26, 2012 -
14:00 to 15:30
Location: 
OCHS Library

Yeats once wrote ‘I know nothing but the novels of Balzac and the aphorisms of Patanjali’. In setting a worldly French novelist against a Indian mystical philosopher, Yeats is not merely recasting the dialogue of self and soul that has governed so much of his poetry; he is signaling that one side of the debate has staked out its position in India, and that the terms of the discussion have changed. Though he had found poetic inspiration in India earlier in his career, Yeats’s final and most productive foray into Indic traditions would challenge his conceptions of self, God and destiny.

First name (inc. titles): 
W. David

Vaishnava Features of Traditional Hatha yoga

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr James Mallinson
Date: 
Thursday, March 8, 2012 -
14:00 to 15:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

The history of hatha yoga is only now becoming clear through close attention to the textual tradition. This seminar examines the Vaishnava roots of some hatha yoga practice.

 
Dr James Mallinson has a BA in Sanskrit from Oxford and an MA with a major in ethnography from SOAS. His DPhil. thesis at Oxford was a critical edition of the Khecarividya, a Kaula work on khecarimudra, an important technique of hathayoga. After his DPhil. he translated Sanskrit poetry for the Clay Sanskrit Library for six years.
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr James

The Śākta Co-option of Haṭhayoga

Lecture Type: 
Sakta Conference 2011
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr James Mallinson
Date: 
Saturday, September 10, 2011 -
14:30 to 15:30
Location: 
Somerville College, Oxford

Text-critical study of the earliest texts to teach haṭhayoga (c.11th-13th centuries) shows that in its first formulations it was closely associated with traditional ascetic practice and that the aim of its techniques, which were physical, was to boost the beneficial effects of celibacy (or, at least, continence). Śākta traditions dating to a similar period had developed a system of yoga in which the yogin visualised the rising of Kuṇḍalinī from the base of the spine up through a series of cakras.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr James

Yoginīyoga/Yogin as Yoginī: On the sādhana of female deities in Indian tantric Buddhism of the tenth to twelfth century

Lecture Type: 
Sakta Conference 2011
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Harunaga Isaacson
Date: 
Sunday, September 11, 2011 -
09:30 to 10:30
Location: 
Somerville College, Oxford

Harunaga Isaacson was born in Kuma, Japan, in 1965. He studied philosophy and Indology at the University of Groningen (MA 1990), and was awarded a PhD in Sanskrit by the University of Leiden (1995). From Fall 1995 to Summer 2000 he was a post-doctoral research fellow at the Oriental Institute, Oxford University.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Harunaga

The abundance and vicissitudes of multiplicity: The case of chaunsatha yoginis

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Nilima Chitgopekar
Date: 
Wednesday, March 3, 2004 - 12:30
Location: 
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Nilima

Hinduism II lecture series: Yoga, bhakti, tantra (eight lectures)

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin Flood
Date: 
Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 11:15
Location: 

A series of eight lectures

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of "Hindu" traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal.
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin

Yoga and vyaakarana

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Seminar
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Ashok Aklujkar
Date: 
Thursday, May 12, 2005 - 16:15
Location: 
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Ashok

It's a kind of magic: The powers of yoga and their interpretation

Lecture Type: 
Majewski Lecture
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Angelika Malinar
Date: 
Monday, October 30, 2006 - 10:15
Location: 

Flying through the air, the remembrance of former existence, being insensitive to pain - all these phenomena are known as the 'power' of Yogins and are usually regarded as signs of a successful practice of Yoga.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Angelika

How much of yoga did Shankara accept in his formulation of Advaita Vedanta

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Seminar
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor T.S. Rukmani
Date: 
Friday, May 11, 2007 - 17:45
Location: 

Shankara opposes the dualistic Yoga as much as the Samkhya in his Brahmasutrabhasya and other works. But one clearly sees that his opposition does not extend to the methodology of Yoga. He generally speaks favourably of yogic practices and even accepts the siddhis of Yoga. Sankara mentions the threefold sravana, manana and nididhyasana as of paramount importance for brahman-realization. While sravana is translated as hearing and studying the relevant sacred texts and manana as reflection on what one has learnt from the texts, nididhyasana is usually translated as samadhi as well as dhyana.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor. T.S.

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 2: The Samkhya and Yoga

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin Flood
Date: 
Wednesday, January 28, 2009 - 11:00
Location: 
Theology Faculty Seminar Room

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Gavin

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