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Temple and Text

The Dance Performed by the Temple: the Dynamics of Hindu Temple Architecture

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Adam Hardy
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 17:30
Location: 

Session 17 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference.

In the forms of shrine, which developed between the 7th and 13th centuries, Hindu temples, conceived as divine bodies, embodied structured patterns of movement in their architectural compositions. Shrines are invested with a sense of centrifugal dynamism that appears to originate at the tip of the finial, or a point just above it, progressing downwards from this point and outwards from the vertical axis.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Adam

Temple Texts and Cultural Performances in South Asia

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Avanthi Meduri
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 16:30
Location: 

Session 18 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference

 
This paper will discuss the centrality of the temple text in the classical arts of South Asia, and focus specifically on the aesthetic vision of the late Dr. Rukmini Devi Arundale, the celebrated revivalist of twentieth- century Bharatanatyam.
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Avanthi

Performing Konarak, Performing Hirapur

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Alessandra Lopez y Royo
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 15:30
Location: 

Session 19 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference.

 
My paper will consider the relationship of dance, in this case, Odissi, and archaeology, here represented by the two archaeological temple sites of Konarak and Hirapur, in Orissa, where the dance performance I will be discussing was filmed. What is foregrounded here is the use we make of archaeological sites and of dance performance in our project of re-imagining history and re-imagining the past.
 
Odissi is one of the recognised classical dances of contemporary India, said to have originated from the ritualistic and age old dance and
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Alessandra Lopez y

Seeing the Bhakti Movement

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor John Stratton Hawley
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 14:30
Location: 

Session 14 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference. 

 
In this paper, I would propose to ask what we can make of the “bhakti movement” picture, when we look at it more closely.  Prioritizing Vaishnavism—the sometimes unspoken point of reference for much “bhakti movement” thinking—I will begin by considering the text usually held to have exerted the greatest force on Hindu bhakti generally, the Bhagavata Purana.  Where, if at all, can it be seen in stone?
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor John Stratton

Hindu Samnyasins in the Temple Context

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor T.S. Rukmani
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 13:30
Location: 

Session 13 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference

The Hindu temple is a religious site and signifies some ritual activity. The general perception of a samnyasin, on the other hand, is one not associated with ritual activity as that is seen as perpetuating worldly existence or samsara.

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor T.S.

The Temple in Sanskrit Legal Literature

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Patrick Olivelle
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 09:30
Location: 

Session 12 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference.

This paper will examine the relationship between temples and the ideologies and practices underlying the mainstream of the Brahmanical tradition and the ascetical institutions of ancient India. The "Hindu" temple is a relatively new institution rising in the early centuries of the common era. Brahmanical ritual both in its public and domestic expressions had existed without temples for over a millennium.
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Patrick

Absence and Presence: Worshipping the Jina at Ellora

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Lisa Nadine Owen
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 11:30
Location: 

How does one worship a liberated being who is technically inaccessible?  This is the fundamental question that I propose to answer within the context of Ellora’s Jain cave-temples.  In the early ninth through tenth century, temples with shrines containing a life-sized Jina image were hewn out of rock.  Among the earliest of these temples is a monument known today as the Chota Kailasa.  As its appellation suggests, this temple resembles the site’s larger and more famous Kailasanatha temple in terms of its execution, architectural components, and designation of sacred space.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Lisa Nadine

The Ritual Culture Of Temples And Icons in Jainism

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor John E. Cort
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 01:30
Location: 

Session 15 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference.

As part of his mendicant vows, a Jain monk is committed to total non-possession.*  He owns nothing.  He is dependent upon the laity for even his robes , bowls, staff, and other ritual insignia and paraphernalia.  These are, so to speak, "loaned" to him by the laity.  In theory he should not ask even for these, and if the laity choose not to provide them, he should do without.

 
Jain temples are the sites of great wealth and display.
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor John E.

Colonial Modernity, Memory and the Devadasi Dance Tradition of the Viralmalai Murukan Temple

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Davesh Soneji
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 12:30
Location: 

Session 20 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Davesh

Sastra and Prayoga: Building Bridges Between Text and Performance in the Sanskritic Tradition

Lecture Type: 
Shivdasani Conference 2007
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor Mandakranta Bose
Date: 
Sunday, October 21, 2007 - 12:00
Location: 

Session 21 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference. 

While the general interest of this symposium lies in the relationships between temples, architecture, texts and performance, my presentation focuses on the relation between the formal description and analysis of dance and its practice. My discussion draws exclusively upon the primary source material for our knowledge of the performing arts of India, that is, the extensive body of Sanskrit texts on dance, drama and music.

 
I must also clarify here that I understand the term “dance” as a hybrid performance genre that consists of non-mimetic
First name (inc. titles): 
Professor Mandakranta

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