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Mahabharata

The importance of Bhishma for Indo-European cultural comparativism

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Nick Allen
Date: 
Thursday, May 6, 2004 - 12:30
Location: 
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Nick

Female speakers in the Upanishads and Mahabharata

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Brian Black
Date: 
Tuesday, May 3, 2005 - 16:30
Location: 
First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Brian

Towards an Existential Textology of the so-called 'Sanskrit epics'

Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr Simon Brodbeck
Date: 
Thursday, October 29, 2009 - 14:00
Location: 
OCHS Library

The Ramayana tells of the war, on distant soil, between Rama Dasharatha of Ayodhya and Ravana’s demon hordes—in which Rama was the victor.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr Simon

Telling the World: Exploring the Cultural and Intellectual Agenda of the Sanskrit Mahabharata

Lecture Type: 
Majewski Lecture
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Dr James Hegarty
Date: 
Monday, May 16, 2011 -
17:00 to 19:00
Location: 
Lecture Room 1, Oriental Institute

In this lecture, I explore the form and function of the Sanskrit Mahabharata. I take up features of its design, its explicit statements about itself and its most prominent themes in order to make some suggestions as to what the Mahabharata sought to do, culturally and intellectually,in early South Asian society. I combine this with an analysis of the presence of the Mahabharata in select literary and epigraphical sources of the first millennium in order to explore the impact of the text from Guptan north India to Kerala and Kashmir.

First name (inc. titles): 
Dr James

How japa changed between the Vedas and the bhakti traditions: the evidence of the Jāpakopākhyāna (Mbh 12.189–93)

Lecture Type: 
Majewski Lecture
Full Name (inc. titles): 
Professor John Brockington
Date: 
Monday, October 24, 2011 -
17:00 to 19:00
Location: 
Lecture Room 1, Oriental Institute

The term japa is one that has a long history within the family of Hindu traditions but the difference between the murmuring of Vedic mantras as an accompaniment to sacrificial rituals and the meditative repetition of a divine name in bhakti traditions is considerable. In an attempt to find some evidence for the development process involved, I shall examine theJāpakopākhyāna (MBh 12.189–93), a text which seems in some ways incongruous in its context, and will also survey the occurrence of japa and its cognates throughout theMahābhārata. I seek to unravel the textual history of the passage and

First name (inc. titles): 
Professor John