Skip directly to content

Lectures on Christianity

The study Of Vaishnava and Christian Theology

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
27 Oct 2000

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Vaisnava

Hindu goddesses and Christian theology: With special attention to two Tamil hymns in the antati style

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
25 Feb 2003

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Goddesses

A Christian theology of religions in light of Hinduism (ten lectures)

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
1 May 2003

These lectures aim to delineate the methods and goals of a Christian theology of religions informed by the faith, practice, and theologies of another religious tradition. In the limited space of these lectures, the Christian tradition will be discussed primarily in its Roman Catholic form; (certain strands of) Hinduism will serve as the example of another religious tradition.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Understanding Hindus as an educational exercise in understanding self and other

Peggy Morgan
22 Jan 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Christian and Indian traditions in historical perspective (part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series)

Dr Dermot Killingley
29 Jan 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Authority and scripture in Hindu and Christian thought

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
5 Feb 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Text

Violence and peacemaking in Hindu and Christian tradition

Dr Kenneth Valpey
12 Feb 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Violence and peacemaking in Hindu and Christian tradition

Rev. Dr Stephen Finamore
12 Feb 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Christian theological responses to Hinduism (part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series)

Rev. Dr Michael Barnes
19 Feb 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Jesuits and brahmins in 16th-18th century India

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
19 Feb 2004

Related: Christianity

Christian theological responses to Hinduism (part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series)

Dr Ravi Gupta
19 Feb 2004

Part of the 'Relating to the other: Hindu and Christian perspectives' series.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

The Apirami Antati and Mataracamman Antati: Hindu and Christian theological hymns in a Tamil style

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
5 Mar 2004

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Literature

A Christian understanding of monotheism: In conversation with Hindu perspectives

Professor George Pattison
27 May 2004

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Fifty years of ashram life: Reminiscences from jyotiniketan

Rev. Dr Murray Rogers
11 Jun 2004

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

The mediator: The priest in film

Religion and film seminars
Professor George Pattison
27 Feb 2006

Prof. George Pattison, Theology Faculty, Christchurch College, Oxford

Related: Christianity, Film

Towards a comparative theology of the person

Graduate seminar
Nicholas Bamford
27 Feb 2007

Comparative theology is an important area of research in the contemporary world. This paper will develop the idea of the person as a fruitful category for comparative theological inquiry. The seminar will raise questions about the person as an ontological category and its possible future development with particular reference to Saiva theology in dialogue with Orthodox Christianity.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Saiva

Surrender to God in Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism-Professor Ward Talk

Surrender to God in Islam, Christianity, and Hinduism
Professor Keith Ward
24 Jan 2008

This afternoon conference examines the idea of surrender to God in three religions and provides the opportunity to address comparative theological concerns. In all three theistic traditions there is the idea of human surrender to God. The conference will explore what this means in the different traditions and look towards a theological dialogue between them.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Mystical Traditions in Comparative Perspective: Session Four - Christian mystical traditions 2 ‚ Understanding Apophaticism

Professor George Pattison
19 Feb 2010

Mysticism is a term that has fallen out of use in recent years, partly due to the critique of essentialism in the history of religions, partly due to the recognition that mysticism is particular to tradition and culture and partly due to the orientation to understand religion in terms of a politics of culture that sees religion purely in constructivist terms. The abstraction ‘mysticism’ is a problematic category that has been developed from Christian mystical theology (in contrast to dogmatic or natural theology). Viewing other religions through the lens of ‘mysticism’, particularly the religions of India and China, has tended to give a distorted picture to the West, underlined by Radhakrishnan’s claim, among others, that the east is ‘spiritual’ while the west is ‘material’. Of course, the historical reality of religious traditions is much more complex than this. Nevertheless, religious traditions are interested in, and develop, keen senses of inwardness that lay stress upon a direct understanding or experience of transcendence. While acknowledging the problematic nature of the category ‘mysticism,’ this series of seminars intends to explore the mystical traditions of specific religions in dialogue with Hinduism. The series is seen as an exercise in comparative theology. Short lectures on the mystical traditions would be followed by a response from a Hindu perspective and general discussion.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Mysticism

Mystical Traditions in Comparative Perspective: Session Five - The Jewish Roots of Christian Mysticism

Professor Guy Stroumsa
5 Mar 2010

Mysticism is a term that has fallen out of use in recent years, partly due to the critique of essentialism in the history of religions, partly due to the recognition that mysticism is particular to tradition and culture and partly due to the orientation to understand religion in terms of a politics of culture that sees religion purely in constructivist terms. The abstraction ‘mysticism’ is a problematic category that has been developed from Christian mystical theology (in contrast to dogmatic or natural theology). Viewing other religions through the lens of ‘mysticism’, particularly the religions of India and China, has tended to give a distorted picture to the West, underlined by Radhakrishnan’s claim, among others, that the east is ‘spiritual’ while the west is ‘material’. Of course, the historical reality of religious traditions is much more complex than this. Nevertheless, religious traditions are interested in, and develop, keen senses of inwardness that lay stress upon a direct understanding or experience of transcendence. While acknowledging the problematic nature of the category ‘mysticism,’ this series of seminars intends to explore the mystical traditions of specific religions in dialogue with Hinduism. The series is seen as an exercise in comparative theology. Short lectures on the mystical traditions would be followed by a response from a Hindu perspective and general discussion.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Judaism, Mysticism

Mysterium Horrendum: Mysticism & the Negative Numinous

Interdisciplinary Seminar in the Study of Religions/Mysticism Seminar
Dr Simon Podmore
28 Jan 2011

According to Rudolf Otto’s ‘Idea of the Holy’, while elements of a so-called ‘mysticism of horror’ are well-acknowledged in Hindu traditions, this remains an under-recognised, yet undeniably present, strain in Western Christian mysticism. This paper explores Otto’s account of the ‘negative numinous’ with specific reference to the under-examined notion of the mysterium horrendum: a variant of the mysterium tremendum et fascinans in which the element of dread is ‘cut loose’ and ‘intensified’ to the point of ‘the demonic’. Drawing particular attention to accounts of the darkness, absence, and wrath of God in Western Christian mysticism, the lecture questions the essential relation between the demonic and the divine elements encountered in the numinous.

Dr Simon D. Podmore is a British Academy Postdoctoral Fellow in the Faculty of Theology and Gordon Milburn Junior Research Fellow at Trinity College. He is author of Kierkegaard & the Self Before God: Anatomy of the Abyss (Indiana University Press, 2011). His current research explores notions of ‘spiritual struggle’ in Western Christian mysticism.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology, Mysticism

Naming the divine: A History of the Concept of God

God Across Cultures
Dr Philip Kennedy
28 Feb 2011

Wittgenstein once asked, ‘How do I know that two people mean the same when each says he believes in God?’ This seminar will respond to Wittgenstein’s query by sketching the history of the noun ‘God’, and illustrating how, over time, the noun has accrued some strikingly different meanings.

 
Dr Philip Kennedy is fellow of Mansfield College and Lecturer in Theology in the Theology Faculty. He is author of A Modern Introduction to Theology: New Questions for Old Beliefs. London: I.B. Tauris, 2006; ‘God and Creation’, in Mary Catherine Hilkert and Robert J. Schreiter, eds; ‘The Praxis of the Reign of God: An Introduction to the Theology of Edward Schillebeeckx’ (New York: Fordham University Press, 2002), pp. 37–58. His research interests include the History of Modern Christian Thought; Christology and the Quests for the Historical Jesus; Liberation Theologies. He is currently working on a book on the history of the idea of God.

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology

Bishop Appasamy and Comparative Theology in India

Graduate Seminar
Brian Dunn
31 May 2012

A.J. Appasamy (1891-1975) was a Harvard, Oxford and Marburg trained Tamil Christian theologian who served as an Anglican priest and seminary professor in India before Independence, and post-Independence, as the first Bishop of Coimbatore in the Church of South India. Working from the premise that doctrines and theological systems are largely cultural and linguistic negotiations, and therefore provisional rather than permanent constructs, Appasamy’s earliest interest was in recasting Christianity as a living bhakti (‘devotional’) tradition in the Subcontinent. As his comparative practice matures there is a noticeable shift in his thinking away from larger generalized groupings of ‘religions,’ such as ‘Christianity’ and ‘Hinduism,’ and increasingly towards particular interaction with specific thinkers, texts and traditions. Concurrent to this he began to develop a methodology by which to do so that employs the Vedantic epistemological categories known as pramanas (‘evidences’). This paper will consider how Appasamy’s theological project and method might fruitfully be applied to the field of scholarship known today as ‘comparative theology,’ especially as it pertains to the Indian context. Building on Appasamy’s use of the pramanas, I will add my own proposal that comparative theologians from all traditions might draw further benefit from the clarity of the dialectical structure of the Vedantic commentarial tradition.

 
Brian Dunn is currently pursuing his doctoral research in the field of comparative theology at the Theology Faculty, Oxford. His present focus is on the life and writings of a South Indian Christian theologian, Ayadurai Jesudason Appasamy, and his particular comparative interaction with Hindu philosophical and theological conceptions of divine embodiment. 

Related: Christianity, Comparative Theology