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Lectures on General

Introduction to Hinduism I (eight lectures)

Professor Klaus Klostermaier
25 Jan 1998

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Introduction to Hinduism I (eight lectures)

Professor Thomas J. Hopkins
25 Jan 1999

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Hinduism II: An introduction to Hindu scriptures

Professor Klaus Klostermaier
25 Jan 2000

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Hinduism and music: Past and present (eight lectures)

Dr Guy L. Beck
25 Jan 2002

Related: General, Music

Hindu Studies: Mapping the field

Professor M Narasimhachary
1 May 2002

This course will explore a variety of approaches to the stuffy of Hindu communities and culture, identities, philosophies, ethics, spiritualities and worship. It will take account of the perspectives of practising Hindus in the UK and the place of dialogue amongst Hindus and between Hindus and those of other traditions.

Related: General

Classics of Hindu theology 1 (six lectures)

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
1 May 2002

To introduce students to systematic philosophical and theological thinking in Hindu theistic traditions, this term's lectures examine the Srimad Rahasyatrayasara (The Essence of the Three Holy Mysteries) of the 14th century south Indian Vaisnava theologian Vedanta Desika, in the context of earlier south Indian Vaisnavism. Some comparison and contrast will be made with another great classic, the Saiva Civananacittiyar (The Perfection of the Knowledge of Siva) of the 14th century Saiva theologian Arulnanti. (In a later series of lectures, Arulnanti's work will be the prime focus.) Special attention will be paid to problems in interpretation and comparative methodology. These lectures are intended primarily for students in theology and religious studies; no background in Indian studies or theology required, although such background would be useful.

Related: General, Hindu Theology

Hindu Studies: Mapping the field

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
1 May 2002

This course will explore a variety of approaches to the stuffy of Hindu communities and culture, identities, philosophies, ethics, spiritualities and worship. It will take account of the perspectives of practising Hindus in the UK and the place of dialogue amongst Hindus and between Hindus and those of other traditions.

Related: General

Hindu Studies: Mapping the field

Shaunaka Rishi Das
1 May 2002

This course will explore a variety of approaches to the stuffy of Hindu communities and culture, identities, philosophies, ethics, spiritualities and worship. It will take account of the perspectives of practising Hindus in the UK and the place of dialogue amongst Hindus and between Hindus and those of other traditions.

Related: General

Hindu Studies: Mapping the field

Peggy Morgan
1 May 2002

This course will explore a variety of approaches to the stuffy of Hindu communities and culture, identities, philosophies, ethics, spiritualities and worship. It will take account of the perspectives of practising Hindus in the UK and the place of dialogue amongst Hindus and between Hindus and those of other traditions.

Related: General

What's a Hindu?

The IK Foundation Lectures 2002
Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
12 May 2002

What's a Hindu?: The term 'Hindu', where it comes from and what it represents. Looking at the fundamental principles, values, culture that we may call Hindu.

Related: General

What's a Hindu?

The IK Foundation Lectures 2002
Professor M Narasimhachary
15 May 2002

What's a Hindu?: The term 'Hindu', where it comes from and what it represents. Looking at the fundamental principles, values, culture that we may call Hindu.

Related: General

Western categories, Indian intellectual traditions

Professor M Narasimhachary
16 May 2002

Related: General

Western categories, Indian intellectual traditions

Dr Kenneth Valpey
16 May 2002

Related: General

Western categories, Indian intellectual traditions

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
16 May 2002

Related: General

Western categories, Indian intellectual traditions

Dr Sanjukta Gupta
16 May 2002

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Overview of participants academic projects

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
21 Jan 2004

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Hinduism I: Primary texts in translation (eight lectures)

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
25 Jan 2004

A series of eight lectures

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Hinduism I: Primary texts in translation (eight lectures)

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
25 Jan 2004

These lectures, for which the source material lies (almost entirely) in Sanskrit texts read in English translation and with the help of reliable secondary sources, treats major components of the brahminical Hindu tradition which, though of ancient origin, is still relevant today. Particular attention will be paid to important themes developed in the listed primary texts read in translation. The approach taken is classical and textual. These lectures are intended for students in theology and religious studies.

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On defining Hinduism

Majewski Lecture
Professor Julius Lipner
18 Feb 2004

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Reviewing Hilary Term

Professor Francis X. Clooney, SJ
10 Mar 2004

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Hinduism II: Bhakti through vernacular traditions (eight lectures)

Professor Pratap Kumar
1 May 2005

Eight Sessions

Session 1: Historical Overview of Bhakti in India
 
Session 2: South Indian Bhakti Traditions: Tamil Alvars
 
Session 3: North Indian Bhakti Traditions: Kabir, Mirabai, Tulsidas
 
Session 4: South Indian Shaiva Bhakti: Tamil Nayanmars
 
Session 5: Shaiva Bhakti in the North (Kashmir)
 
Session 6: The Goddess Bhakti Tradition of India
 
Session 7: Goddess in Bengal Tradition (Kali, Uma)
 
Session 8: Goddess in Popular Hinduism

Related: Bhakti, General

Hinduism I series: Themes and textual sources (eight lectures)

Professor Gavin Flood
20 Oct 2005
This series of eigth lectures offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focussing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on both philosophical and social issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. Not only presenting an account of the texts and traditions, the course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. The last two lectures will examine contemporary traditions in Kerala and we will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.
 
Lecture Schedule
  • Introduction: What is Hinduism?
  • The Vedas and Vedic traditions.
  • The Upanishads: the Chandogya and Svetashvatara
  • Dharma, society and gender
  • Theistic Traditions 1
  • Theistic Traditions 2
  • Local Traditions: Kerala
  • Hinduism and Modernity

Related: General

Beyond the image: Hinduism in the media

Shaunaka Rishi Das
30 May 2006

Related: General

Hinduism I series (eight lectures)

Professor Gavin Flood
20 Oct 2006

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Lecture Schedule

  • Introduction: What is Hinduism?
  • The Veda and vedic traditions.
  • Dharma, society and gender
  • Ascetic Traditions
  • Indian Theism
  • Philosophical Traditions 1
  • Philosophical Traditions 2
  • Hinduism and Modernity

Related: General

Hinduism II series (eight lectures)

Professor Gavin Flood
25 Jan 2007

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of Hinduism. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical, theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hinduism, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.
 
Lecture Schedule
  • Introduction: the question of soteriology in India
  • Sankhya and Yoga
  • Yoga-sutras of Patañjali
  • Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters
  • Bhakti literatures and Ritual texts
  • The Sant tradition: Kabir, Mirabai
  • The Pancaratra
  • Saivism

Related: General

Hinduism One, Part 1

Professor Gavin Flood
11 Oct 2007

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Hinduism One, Part 2

Professor Gavin Flood
18 Oct 2007

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Hinduism One, Part 3

Professor Gavin Flood
25 Oct 2007

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Hinduism One, Part 5

Professor Gavin Flood
8 Nov 2007

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Hinduism One, Part 6

Professor Gavin Flood
15 Nov 2007

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Hinduism One, Part 7

Professor Gavin Flood
29 Nov 2007

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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 1

Professor Gavin Flood
17 Jan 2008

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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 2

Professor Gavin Flood
24 Jan 2008

Related: General

Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 3

Professor Gavin Flood
31 Jan 2008

Related: General

Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 4

Professor Gavin Flood
7 Feb 2008

Related: General

Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 5

Professor Gavin Flood
14 Feb 2008

Related: General

Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 6

Professor Gavin Flood
21 Feb 2008

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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 7

Professor Gavin Flood
28 Feb 2008

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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 8

Professor Gavin Flood
6 Mar 2008

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 2

Professor Gavin Flood
22 Oct 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 3

Professor Gavin Flood
29 Oct 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 4

Professor Gavin Flood
5 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 5

Professor Gavin Flood
12 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 6

Professor Gavin Flood
19 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 7

Professor Gavin Flood
26 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 8

Professor Gavin Flood
3 Dec 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 1: Introduction: the question of soteriology in India

Professor Gavin Flood
21 Jan 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 2: The Samkhya and Yoga

Professor Gavin Flood
28 Jan 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General, Samkhya, Yoga

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 3: Yoga-sutras of Patanjali

Professor Gavin Flood
4 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General, Yoga

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 4: Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters

Professor Gavin Flood
11 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: Bhakti, General, Yoga

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 5: Bhakti literatures and ritual texts

Professor Gavin Flood
18 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: Bhakti, General

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 6: The Sant tradition: Kabir

Professor Gavin Flood
25 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: Bhakti, General

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 7: The Pancaratra

Professor Gavin Flood
4 Mar 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General, Pancaratra

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 8: Monistic Saivism

Professor Gavin Flood
11 May 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism.

 
While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General, Saiva

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 1: Introduction

Professor Gavin Flood
14 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 1

Professor Gavin Flood
15 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the VedÅnta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 2: The Veda and Vedic traditions

Professor Gavin Flood
21 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General, Veda

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 3: Dharma, Society and Gender

Professor Gavin Flood
28 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General, Society

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 4: Ascetic Traditions

Professor Gavin Flood
4 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: Asceticism, General, Upanisads

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 5: Indian Theism

Professor Gavin Flood
11 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General, Hindu Theology

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 6: Philosophical Traditions I

Professor Gavin Flood
18 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General, Philosophy

Hinduism II: Session One

Professor Gavin Flood
20 Jan 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Two

Professor Gavin Flood
27 Jan 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Three

Professor Gavin Flood
3 Feb 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Four

Professor Gavin Flood
10 Feb 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Five

Professor Gavin Flood
17 Feb 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Six

Professor Gavin Flood
24 Feb 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Seven

Professor Gavin Flood
3 Mar 2010

Related: General

Hinduism II: Session Eight

Professor Gavin Flood
10 Mar 2010

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - Introduction: The Indus Valley Culture and the Controversy of Origins

Professor Gavin Flood
13 Oct 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 2: The Veda and Vedic Traditions

Professor Gavin Flood
20 Oct 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 3: Dharma, Society and Gender

Professor Gavin Flood
27 Oct 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 4: Ascetic Traditions

Professor Gavin Flood
3 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 5: The Epics and the Early Development of Theism

Professor Gavin Flood
10 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 6: The Bhagavad-gita

Professor Gavin Flood
17 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 8: Philosophical Traditions

Professor Gavin Flood
1 Dec 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture One

Professor Gavin Flood
19 Jan 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism I: Introduction

Professor Pratap Kumar
25 Jan 2011

Session 1: Introduction to Hinduism: History, Sources, and Ethos 

Session 2: Upanishadic Teachings: Idea of Brahman, Self, and Liberation 

Session 3: Hindu Laws (dharma): Ramayana and Manu’s Laws 

Session 4: God and the Goddess: Bhagavad-Gita and Devi Gita

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Two

Professor Gavin Flood
26 Jan 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Three

Professor Gavin Flood
2 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Four

Professor Gavin Flood
9 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Five

Professor Gavin Flood
16 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Six

Professor Gavin Flood
23 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Seven

Professor Gavin Flood
2 Mar 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Eight

Professor Gavin Flood
9 Mar 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: General

Hinduism One: Week One

Professor Gavin Flood
12 Oct 2011

Related: General

Hinduism One: Week Two

Professor Gavin Flood
19 Oct 2011

Related: General

Theories of the Text: Week Two

Professor Gavin Flood
20 Oct 2011

Related: General, Philosophy

Hinduism One: Week Three

Professor Gavin Flood
26 Oct 2011

Related: General

Hinduism One: Week Four

Professor Gavin Flood
2 Nov 2011

Related: General

Hinduism One: Week Five

Professor Gavin Flood
9 Nov 2011

Related: General

Hinduism One: Week Six

Professor Gavin Flood
16 Nov 2011

Related: General

Hinduism One: Week Seven

Professor Gavin Flood
23 Nov 2011

Related: General

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 7: Philosophical Traditions II

Professor Gavin Flood
25 Nov 2011

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: General, Philosophy

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 8: Hinduism and Modernity

Professor Gavin Flood
2 Dec 2011

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and 

Related: General, Modern India

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session One

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
18 Jan 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Two

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
25 Jan 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Three

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
1 Feb 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Four

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
8 Feb 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Five

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
15 Feb 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Six

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
22 Feb 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Seven

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
29 Feb 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General

Hinduism II (Paper 21 Bhakti Vernaculars): Session Eight

Dr Rembert Lutjeharms
7 Mar 2012

These lectures will take up where Hinduism 1 left off, examining in particular conceptions of liberation and paths leading to it in the post-classical, post-Gupta period. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of the Vedanta. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) in the Vaishnava traditions. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaishnavism and Shaivism. We will end with an examination of contemporary Hinduism at village level and in its interaction with modernity. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: General