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Lectures by Professor Gavin Flood

Elementary Sanskrit Session 8

24 Jun 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Eight

1 Dec 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Seven

24 Nov 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Six

17 Nov 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Five

10 Nov 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Four

3 Nov 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Three

27 Oct 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Two

20 Oct 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week Two

20 Oct 2011
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Theories of the Text: Week One

13 Oct 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Eight

1 Dec 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Seven

24 Nov 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Six

17 Nov 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Five

10 Nov 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Four

3 Nov 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Three

27 Oct 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week Two

20 Oct 2011
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Further Sanskrit: Week One

13 Oct 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Eight

30 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Eight

2 Dec 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Seven

25 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Seven

23 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Six

16 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Six

18 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Five

11 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Five

9 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Four

2 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Four

4 Nov 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Three

28 Oct 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Two

19 Oct 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Two

21 Oct 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week One

14 Oct 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week One

12 Oct 2011
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Sanskrit Prelims: Week Three

26 Oct 2011
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Hinduism One: Week Seven

23 Nov 2011
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Hinduism One: Week Six

16 Nov 2011
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Hinduism One: Week Five

9 Nov 2011
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Hinduism One: Week Four

2 Nov 2011
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Hinduism One: Week Three

26 Oct 2011
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Hinduism One: Week Two

19 Oct 2011
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Hinduism One: Week One

12 Oct 2011
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Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 8: Hinduism and Modernity

2 Dec 2011

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and 

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 8: Hinduism and Modernity

2 Dec 2011

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and 

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Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 1: Introduction

14 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 2: The Veda and Vedic traditions

21 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 2: The Veda and Vedic traditions

21 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 1

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 3: Dharma, Society and Gender

28 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 3: Dharma, Society and Gender

28 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 1

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 4: Ascetic Traditions

4 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 4: Ascetic Traditions

4 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 1

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 4: Ascetic Traditions

4 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 2

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 5: Indian Theism

11 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 5: Indian Theism

11 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 1

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 6: Philosophical Traditions I

18 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 6: Philosophical Traditions I

18 Nov 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 1

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 7: Philosophical Traditions II

25 Nov 2011

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and Textual Sources Lecture 7: Philosophical Traditions II

25 Nov 2011

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Eight

3 Dec 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Eight

3 Dec 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session One

22 Jan 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session One

22 Jan 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Two

29 Jan 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Two

29 Jan 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Three

5 Feb 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Three

5 Feb 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Four

12 Feb 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Four

12 Feb 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Five

19 Feb 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Five

19 Feb 2010
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The Śaiva commentarial tradition 2 Week 6

25 Jan 2010

Continuing the Śaiva theme we will contrast the Saiddhāntika theology with the non-Saiddhāntika understanding of revelation through focussing firstly on Abhinavagupta’s commentary on the root text of his tradition, the Mālinīvijayottara-tantra. We will read the Mālinīślokavārttika I, 1. Reading: Hanneder, Jurgen. Abhinavagupta’s Philosophy of Revelation (Forsten 1998).

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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Six

26 Feb 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Six

26 Feb 2010
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The Śaiva commentarial tradition 3 Week 7

4 Mar 2010

The last Śaiva reading will be Kṣemarāja’s independent text the Pratyabhijñāhṛdaya and his auto-commentary. We shall focus on the first nine sūtras. We will see here a non-dualist tradition that contrasts with the Vedānta in its emphasis on the dynamic power (śakti) of its non-theistic absolute reality.Reading: Kṣemarāja, Pratyabhijñāhṛdaya translated by Jaideva Singh (MLBD: Delhi, 1980).

Related: 0

The Śaiva commentarial tradition 3 Week 7

4 Mar 2010

The last Śaiva reading will be Kṣemarāja’s independent text the Pratyabhijñāhṛdaya and his auto-commentary. We shall focus on the first nine sūtras. We will see here a non-dualist tradition that contrasts with the Vedānta in its emphasis on the dynamic power (śakti) of its non-theistic absolute reality.Reading: Kṣemarāja, Pratyabhijñāhṛdaya translated by Jaideva Singh (MLBD: Delhi, 1980).

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Seven

5 Mar 2010
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Seven

5 Mar 2010
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Approaches to Religion 4: Semiotics

9 Jun 2011

Our last seminar will examine the importance of the philosophy of the sign in the study of religions. A key thinker here who we will look at is Bakhtin introduced to the West by Julia Kristeva.

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Approaches to Religion 3: Politics

2 Jun 2011

The third seminar will discuss the relation of religion to politics and the place of religion in the public sphere. We will look at the idea of the critique of religion as emancipatory critique (Nietzsche, Foucault), the exclusion of women from the symbolic order (Kristeva, Irigaray) and how this is articulated in India (Manushi). 

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Approaches to Religion 2: Sociology

12 May 2011

In this seminar we will reflect on Sociology as a discourse inseparable from Modernity. We will discuss the key ideas of rationalisation (Weber) and reification (Lukacs, Honneth). We will also consider sociology in the Indian context (Madan). 

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Approaches to Religion 1: Phenomenology

5 May 2011

This seminar will discuss the foundational ideas of the phenomenology of religion derived from Husserl, namely bracketing (the epoche), the reduction to essences, and the transcendental reduction. We will raise questions as to the viability of this approach.

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Readings in Phenomenology Session 4

26 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 4

26 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 3

19 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 3

19 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 2

12 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 2

12 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 1

5 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology Session 1

5 May 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 5

3 Jun 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 6

10 Jun 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 7

17 Jun 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 4

27 May 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 3

20 May 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 2

13 May 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit Session 1

6 May 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Seven

7 Mar 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Seven

7 Mar 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Six

28 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Six

28 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Five

21 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Five

21 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Four

14 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Four

14 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Three

7 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Three

7 Feb 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Two

31 Jan 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session Two

31 Jan 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session One

24 Jan 2011
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Readings in Phenomenology: Gadamer's ‘Truth and Method’, Session One

24 Jan 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Seven

7 Mar 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Seven

7 Mar 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Six

28 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Six

28 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Five

21 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Five

21 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Four

14 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Four

14 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Three

7 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Three

7 Feb 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Two

31 Jan 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session Two

31 Jan 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session One

24 Jan 2011
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Readings in the Tantric Texts: Jayakhya Samhita, Session One

24 Jan 2011
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Elementary Sanskrit: Week Eight

11 Mar 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Seven

4 Mar 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Six

25 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Five

18 Mar 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Four

11 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Three

4 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Two

28 Jan 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week One

21 Jan 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Eight

9 Mar 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Seven

2 Mar 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Six

23 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Five

16 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Four

9 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Three

2 Feb 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week Two

26 Jan 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Week One

19 Jan 2011

This course provides an introduction to Sanskrit for the preliminary paper in Elementary Sanskrit. The class is designed to introduce students of Theology to the basics of Sanskrit grammar, syntax, and vocabulary. By the end of the course students will have competency in translating simple Sanskrit and reading sections of the Bhagavad-gita and passages from other texts.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Five

16 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Eight

9 Mar 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Seven

2 Mar 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Six

23 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Four

9 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Three

2 Feb 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture Two

26 Jan 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu Traditions, Lecture One

19 Jan 2011

These lectures will begin from where Hinduism 1 left off. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad-gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing both on texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion, and yoga. We will then trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. Lastly we will examine the development of Hinduism in the nineteenth century with the Hindu reformers and the development of a politicised Hinduism in the twentieth century.

Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Six

15 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Seven

22 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Eight

29 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session One

11 Oct 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Two

18 Oct 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Three

25 Oct 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Four

1 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Five

8 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Eight

1 Dec 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Seven

24 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Six

17 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Five

10 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Four

3 Nov 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Three

27 Oct 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Two

20 Oct 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session One

13 Oct 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Six

18 Nov 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Six

18 Nov 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 1

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Five

11 Nov 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Five

11 Nov 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 1

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Four

4 Nov 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Four

4 Nov 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 1

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Three

28 Oct 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Three

28 Oct 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 1

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Two

21 Oct 2011

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session Two

21 Oct 2011

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 1

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session One

14 Oct 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 0

Readings in Tantric Texts: Session One

14 Oct 2010

We will continue to read the Jayakhya Samhita

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Two

21 Oct 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Two

21 Oct 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Three

28 Oct 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Three

28 Oct 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Four

4 Nov 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Four

4 Nov 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session One

14 Oct 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session One

14 Oct 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Six

18 Nov 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Six

18 Nov 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Five

11 Nov 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Five

11 Nov 2010

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. This term we will be reading Gabriel Marcel The Mystery of Being (Le mystère de l’être).

Related: 1

Comparative Mysticism Seminar 3: Unsayability and Meditative Ascent in Esoteric Hindu Traditions

19 Nov 2010

In this seminar we examine two tendencies or spiritual languages in esoteric medieval Hindu traditions. On the one hand we have a style of mysticism that emphasizes a realisation or awakening in the world, usually accompanied by a monistic metaphysics, on the other we have a style and language of meditative ascent; that there is a journey from this world to the state of liberation through stages of development, often conceptualized as occurring within the body. The seminar will examine these tendencies with reference to particular texts.  Gavin Flood is academic director of OCHS. Among his publications are The Tantric Body (2006), The Ascetic Self (2004), and The Blackwell Companion to Hinduism (2003).

Related: 0

Comparative Mysticism Seminar 3: Unsayability and Meditative Ascent in Esoteric Hindu Traditions

19 Nov 2010

In this seminar we examine two tendencies or spiritual languages in esoteric medieval Hindu traditions. On the one hand we have a style of mysticism that emphasizes a realisation or awakening in the world, usually accompanied by a monistic metaphysics, on the other we have a style and language of meditative ascent; that there is a journey from this world to the state of liberation through stages of development, often conceptualized as occurring within the body. The seminar will examine these tendencies with reference to particular texts.  Gavin Flood is academic director of OCHS. Among his publications are The Tantric Body (2006), The Ascetic Self (2004), and The Blackwell Companion to Hinduism (2003).

Related: 1

Comparative Mysticism Seminar 3: Unsayability and Meditative Ascent in Esoteric Hindu Traditions

19 Nov 2010

In this seminar we examine two tendencies or spiritual languages in esoteric medieval Hindu traditions. On the one hand we have a style of mysticism that emphasizes a realisation or awakening in the world, usually accompanied by a monistic metaphysics, on the other we have a style and language of meditative ascent; that there is a journey from this world to the state of liberation through stages of development, often conceptualized as occurring within the body. The seminar will examine these tendencies with reference to particular texts.  Gavin Flood is academic director of OCHS. Among his publications are The Tantric Body (2006), The Ascetic Self (2004), and The Blackwell Companion to Hinduism (2003).

Related: 2

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 8: Philosophical Traditions

1 Dec 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 7: Liberation through Yoga

24 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 6: The Bhagavad-gita

17 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 5: The Epics and the Early Development of Theism

10 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 4: Ascetic Traditions

3 Nov 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 3: Dharma, Society and Gender

27 Oct 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - 2: The Veda and Vedic Traditions

20 Oct 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Sources and Development - Introduction: The Indus Valley Culture and the Controversy of Origins

13 Oct 2010

These lectures offer a thematic and historical introduction to the sources and early development of ‘Hindu’ traditions from their early formation to the early medieval period. We will explore the formation of Hindu traditions through textual sources, such as the Vedas, Upanishads and Bhagavad Gita, along with the practices and social institutions that formed classical Hindu traditions. The lectures will include an introduction to Hindu philosophy.

Related: 0

Hindu Theology: Session Seven - Theological Reasoning Across Traditions

11 Mar 2010

The last session will focus on the nature of theological reasoning that we have been engaged with in the course and the nature of theological reading. The last session will raise questions about whether reasoning is universal, the nature of Hindu theological truth, and the place of Hindu theological reasoning within the western academy. Reading:MacIntyre, W. Three Rival Versions of Moral Inquiry: Encyclopedia, Genealogy and Tradition (University of Notre Dame Press, 1990).

Related: 0

Hindu Theology: Session Four - The Saiva commentarial tradition 1

18 Feb 2010

The class will discuss the Śaiva tantric revelation. We will begin with the theistic or dualistic Śaiva Siddhānta through focussing on chapter 1 (the paśupaṭala) of Rāmakaṇṭha’s commentary on the Kiraṇa-tantra. We will see how Rāmakaṇṭha offers a conservative reading of revelation that he regards as the expression of the highest good (and which other teachings (śāstra) do not give).Reading:Goodall, Dominic. Bhaṭṭa Rāmakaṇṭha’s Commentary on the Kiraṇatantra vol. 1 (Insitut Français de Pondichéry, 1998).

Related: 0

Hindu Theology: Session Four - The Saiva commentarial tradition 1

18 Feb 2010

The class will discuss the Śaiva tantric revelation. We will begin with the theistic or dualistic Śaiva Siddhānta through focussing on chapter 1 (the paśupaṭala) of Rāmakaṇṭha’s commentary on the Kiraṇa-tantra. We will see how Rāmakaṇṭha offers a conservative reading of revelation that he regards as the expression of the highest good (and which other teachings (śāstra) do not give).Reading:Goodall, Dominic. Bhaṭṭa Rāmakaṇṭha’s Commentary on the Kiraṇatantra vol. 1 (Insitut Français de Pondichéry, 1998).

Related: 1

Hindu Theology: Session Three - The Vedanta commentarial tradition 2

11 Feb 2010

We will continue our inquiry into the Vedānta with an examination of Rāmānuja’s commentary on the same text. We will begin to understand the nature of the commentarial tradition as a discussion about the nature of truth across the centuries and the different theological positions developed through history. We will also examine a section from Rāmānuja’s Vedāntasāra.Reading: Rāmānuja, The Vedāntasūtras with the Commentary of Rāmaṇuja translated by G. Thibauty, Sacred Books of the East Series (MLBD: Delhi, 1976).

Related: 0

Hindu Theology: Session Three - The Vedanta commentarial tradition 2

11 Feb 2010

We will continue our inquiry into the Vedānta with an examination of Rāmānuja’s commentary on the same text. We will begin to understand the nature of the commentarial tradition as a discussion about the nature of truth across the centuries and the different theological positions developed through history. We will also examine a section from Rāmānuja’s Vedāntasāra.Reading: Rāmānuja, The Vedāntasūtras with the Commentary of Rāmaṇuja translated by G. Thibauty, Sacred Books of the East Series (MLBD: Delhi, 1976).

Related: 1

Hindu Theology: Session Two - The Vedanta commentarial tradition 1

4 Feb 2010

The course will present an account of the Vedānta commentarial tradition and discuss detailed readings of key texts. We will begin with Śaṅkara’s commentary on the Brahma-sūtra 1.1.1 and his advaita interpretation.Reading: Śaṅkara Brahma-sūtra bhāṣya translated by Swami Gambhirananda (Calcutta: Advaita Ashram, 1983).

Related: 0

Hindu Theology: Session Two - The Vedanta commentarial tradition 1

4 Feb 2010

The course will present an account of the Vedānta commentarial tradition and discuss detailed readings of key texts. We will begin with Śaṅkara’s commentary on the Brahma-sūtra 1.1.1 and his advaita interpretation.Reading: Śaṅkara Brahma-sūtra bhāṣya translated by Swami Gambhirananda (Calcutta: Advaita Ashram, 1983).

Related: 1

Hindu Theology: Session One - Introduction and Scriptural Authority in Hindu Traditions

28 Jan 2010

This series of seminars examines the idea and possibility of Hindu theology. It would survey the history and constructive theological thinking in Hindu traditions. For some scholars both terms ‘Hindu’ and ‘theology’ are impositions upon South Asia of western categories while for others we can speak about ‘Hindu theology’ in a coherent way. While the course would certainly wish to problematise the category, the main focus would be textual and hermeneutical. If a discipline is defined by its object and/or its method then we might say that theology is a discipline whose object is not a theos but rather ‘revelation.’ Such a definition does not necessarily entail intellectual commitments to theism or the truth of ‘revelation’ but rather roots the discipline in a textual history which develops different kinds of reasoning. Hindu theology would therefore focus on the interpretative and commentarial traditions in the history of Hinduism and encourage critical reasoning about them. In practical terms this would mean that the course would concentrate on classical and medieval periods, particularly the Śaiva and Vaiṣṇava theological traditions that have come down to us in Sanskrit commentaries and independent works. It is hoped that the seminars will provoke theological and philosophical reflections on the meaning of the text studied. The seminar series raises questions about the nature of theology, the nature of reasoning, and the task of theological reading in the contemporary context.The first seminar will introduce the traditions and themes of the series which will be text historical and thematic. We will raise the question of the coherence of the category ‘Hindu theology’ and the nature and practice of theological reasoning and then begin our examination of Hindu theology through a discussion of the textual sources of Hinduism regarded as primary (śruti) and secondary revelation (smṛti). We will also consider the idea of ongoing revelation in Hinduism with particular reference to the medieval tantric traditions. The discussion will focus on two core Upaniṣads, the earliest, the Bṛhadāranyaka, and the latest, the Śvetāśvatara. Reading: Clooney, Francis. ‘Restoring “Hindu Theology” as a Category in Indian Intellectual Discourse’ in Flood (ed.) The Blackwell Companion to Hinduism (Blackwell, 2003), pp. 447–77 Olivelle, Patrick. The Early Upanishads (OUP 2000)

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Four

20 May 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Four

20 May 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Three

13 May 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Three

13 May 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Two

6 May 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Two

6 May 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session One

29 Apr 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session One

29 Apr 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Eight

18 Jun 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Eight

18 Jun 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Seven

11 Jun 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Seven

11 Jun 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Six

4 Jun 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Six

4 Jun 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Five

28 May 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Five

28 May 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Four

21 May 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Four

21 May 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session One

30 Apr 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session One

30 Apr 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Two

7 Apr 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Two

7 Apr 2010
Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Three

14 May 2010
Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita: Session Three

14 May 2010
Related: 1

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Eight

18 Jun 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Seven

11 Jun 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Six

4 Jun 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Five

28 May 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Four

21 May 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Three

14 May 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Two

7 May 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session One

30 Apr 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Six

4 Mar 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Six

4 Mar 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Five

25 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Five

25 Feb 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Four

18 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Four

18 Feb 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Three

11 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Three

11 Feb 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Two

4 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Two

4 Feb 2010
Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology: Session One

28 Jan 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session One

28 Jan 2010
Related: 1

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Eight

12 Mar 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Seven

5 Mar 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Six

26 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Five

19 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Four

12 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Three

5 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session Two

29 Jan 2010
Related: 0

Elementary Sanskrit: Session One

22 Jan 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Seven

11 Mar 2010
Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology: Session Seven

11 Mar 2010
Related: 1

Hinduism II: Session One

20 Jan 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Two

27 Jan 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Three

3 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Four

10 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Five

17 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Six

24 Feb 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Seven

3 Mar 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II: Session Eight

10 Mar 2010
Related: 0

Hinduism II series (eight lectures)

25 Jan 2007

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of Hinduism. After an introductory lecture that raises some theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical, theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hinduism, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies. Lecture ScheduleIntroduction: the question of soteriology in IndiaSankhya and YogaYoga-sutras of PatañjaliBhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpretersBhakti literatures and Ritual textsThe Sant tradition: Kabir, MirabaiThe PancaratraSaivism

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An introduction to Hindu tantrism (four lectures)

1 May 2007

This short seminar series is a thematic and historical introduction to Hindu tantric traditions. Beginning with a survey of general features such as systems of mantra, ritual, cosmology, and yoga, we will then go on to examine particular tantric traditions focused on Shiva, Vishnu, and the Goddess. The seminars will mainly explore the medieval period and examine tantrism in the context of political systems of the time, folk religion, traditions of brahmanical learning, and knowledge systems. Part of the seminars will focus on the study of particular texts and reasoning about them with an emphasis on understanding their theological concerns.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 7

3 Dec 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 7

3 Dec 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 6

26 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 6

26 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 5

19 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 5

19 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 4

12 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 4

12 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 3

5 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 3

5 Nov 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 2

29 Oct 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 2

29 Oct 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 1

22 Oct 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 1

22 Oct 2009

We will continue to read through this long text; the ritual sections from chapter 10.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 7

3 Dec 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 7

3 Dec 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 6

26 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 6

26 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 5

19 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 5

19 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 4

12 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 4

12 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 3

5 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 3

5 Nov 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 2

29 Oct 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 2

29 Oct 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 1

22 Oct 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 1

22 Oct 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the phenomenology of religion, in order to understand it, we need to address these fundamental ideas and raise the basic questions of phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence theology, the phenomenology of religion, and other areas in the human sciences.

Related: 1

Hindu understandings of God 4: The theology of Utpaladeva and the monistic Shaivas

12 Mar 2009

We find the idea of God in different religions and it is theologically interesting that semantic analogues of the category appear across the boundaries of traditions. This series of lectures explores Hindu ideas of God and raises questions about the meaning of God in human traditions and the idea of comparative theology.

Related: 0

Hindu understandings of God 4: The theology of Utpaladeva and the monistic Shaivas

12 Mar 2009

We find the idea of God in different religions and it is theologically interesting that semantic analogues of the category appear across the boundaries of traditions. This series of lectures explores Hindu ideas of God and raises questions about the meaning of God in human traditions and the idea of comparative theology.

Related: 1

The importance of religion 2: Towards a theory of religious action

27 Oct 2008

On the one hand there is a critique of religion that sees religion in terms of propositions about the nature of the world. On the other there is a reaction to such claims by the rational defence of religion. But both positions fail to understand the true nature and function of religions as action and responses to life, as ways of life and kinds of action that provide frameworks for living and dying, especially in the context of late modernity and what Richard Roberts has called ‘the reconfiguring of the religious field.’ This lecture develops the idea of religion as action which is also an orientation towards meaning and transcendence; an orientation to understanding life as a journey for both individuals and communities, a journey that can have an end in a ‘liberation’ or a ‘heaven’ or some variation of an ideal of perfection. Religion is always teleological and orientated towards transcendence of the human condition; religion is predominantly soteriological. The theoretical apparatus behind some of this thinking lies in Bakhtin’s Towards a Philosophy of the Act in which he presents a distinction between the world of culture (which contains various theoretical frameworks such as philosophy, sociology, politics) and the world of life, the world in which we live our lives and die and in which acts are accomplished once and for all (and only once) as being is unrepeatable action (Being-as-event). The theory of religious action I am proposing claims that religious action is a penetration of being-as-event, that it is not restricted to the world of culture but is the only practice and discourse that attempts to penetrate, order and make sense of world of life. This world of life is a synonym for the strangeness of the world. It follows from this is that the heart of religion is human action that forms a kind of subjectivity. This action and its accompanying subjectivity is formed only in inter-subjective, tradition specific ways that entail a particular kind of orientation towards the future. This orientation entails hope or anticipation of the future and a retrieval of meaning from the past (expressed as text) which are realised in present action. The sacred text from the past is brought to life through ritual in the living context of present speech for a particular speech community. Religious actions and their accompanying kinds of speech foster a subjectivity, inwardness, or interiority which is the realisation of a religion’s claims, a soteriology, and the projection of a narrative into the future. This kind of inwardness feeds back into the community as a source of life, of new interpretations, and of new vision.

Related: 0

The importance of religion 4: Religion and politics

10 Nov 2008

Religion has always been deeply implicated with politics. While the claim of these lectures is that the religious imperative cannot be reduced to power, the formation of religions as institutions has always been closely implicated in the formation of states and the legitimising of particular social and political structures. Many contemporary thinkers, deriving inspiration from genealogical thinkers such as Foucault, claim that religion can be understood in terms of power relationships and that the discourse of religion hides a will to power. By contrast many religious communities claim that religion is the well spring of their life’s energy and that tradition cannot be explained only in terms of a politics of representation. In this lecture we presented a particular view of the religious imperative as being expressed in a community’s reception of its revelation and the internalisation of the revelation. The lecture will develop the political implications of the religious imperative. We will discuss the externalisation of religious subjectivity through institutions and examine the interface between secular institutions and religious tradition. This is especially pertinent where there is a conflict between religious law and secular law. While the issue of this relation will be examined at a fairly abstract level, engaging with relevant philosophical literature such as Batnitzky’s work on Strauss and Levinas (Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas CUP 2006), the lecture also needs to discuss contemporary examples of the relation of the religious imperative to politics and the conflict of religious and secular law. For religions, adherence to revelation and the law that expresses it is primary, for secular modernity, adherence to secular law is primary. This might also be configured as a conflict between revelation and philosophy. The contemporary religious subject in the global context of late modernity needs to negotiate these complex identities and the success to which that occurs is the degree to which the religious imperative can locate itself within the modern context. 

Related: 0

The importance of religion 5: Religion and art

17 Nov 2008

Shifting from explicit politics to implicit cultural politics, this lecture will focus on the relation of religion to art, raising questions about how religious art expresses tradition and links in to a cosmology absent from secular art. Questions of aesthetics and function will be raised. An exhibition in London by Gilbert and George in January 2006 presented religion through a pastiche of images that showed religions to be essentially oppressive. In the context of this radical juxtaposition between secular art in late modernity and religious art, the lecture will show how the problem of aesthetic appreciation in tradition and modernity is linked to the problem of the world seen as cosmology or as stripped of cosmological understanding. Thus icons, cathedrals and images of gods function only within religious cosmology in contrast to the work of Gilbert and George which draws on an aesthetic devoid of, and antithetical to, religious cosmologies. But the religious imperative, while prototypically expressed in religious tradition, also finds expression through art. In the contemporary context this can be seen especially in the work of artists such as Bill Viola who deals explicitly with the themes of transcendence and being born and dying and whose work attempts to penetrate the world of life. The idea of the artist as shaman who shows human communities something from another place is relevant here. The religious imperative shows us the proximity of art to religion and in the context of modernity shows how art outside of religious tradition nevertheless still deals with questions of transcendent meaning in human life.

Related: 0

The importance of religion 1: Religion and reductionism

20 Oct 2008

Two tendencies in recent years have sought to provide explanations of religion in terms of a naturalist or eliminative reductionism, the realm of science, on the one hand, and a cultural reductionism, the realm of politics, on the other. Eliminative reductionism primarily refers to theories of cognition and evolutionary psychology along with their philosophical justification. By cultural reductionism I mean accounts that see religion only in terms of a politics of representation and structures of power. On this view, religion is a disempowering hegemony caused by a ‘false consciousness’ that has served the interests of the rich and powerful. Both kinds of reductionism share an incredulity to religious truth claims and offer explanation and critique that are rigorously externalist in their explanation of religion and thoroughly materialist in their ontological and ethical pre-commitments. On reductionist accounts, to explain religion is to locate a cause (in cognition, genetics, socio-political structures) and to explain religion is to present an external account of it, often antithetical to the internal claims of traditions. This understanding of explanation has been the predominant model in the natural sciences from Bacon through to the social sciences of our own time. Even Theology traditionally understood claimed to explain religion in this way, locating the cause of religion in God. Scientific explanations have generally been antithetical to Theology in locating causes of religion in nature and claiming superiority to theological accounts because, unlike such accounts, they are falsifiable and have predictive power. Both eliminative and cultural reductionisms offer external accounts of religion through the location of cause, the former in nature the latter in the genealogy of cultural politics, and so do not engage seriously with traditions’ claims and concerns. But there is a different sense of explanation that is not the location of a cause. This is to draw on, or return to, the verstehen tradition in the history of social science where explanation is ‘understanding’ and to claim that the explanation of religion is the exposition of a meaning rather than the location of a cause: to explain religion is not to seek a causal account in the first instance but to show how something is connected to a broader sphere or context and to demonstrate or translate a tradition’s semantic density into a language which is implicitly comparative. This kind of account is both descriptive and interpretative in drawing out the implications of description in theory-informed, semiotically sophisticated ways, and reasoning within the horizon of the western academy. This account is akin to phenomenology in wishing to offer thick description yet like hermeneutics in wishing to inquire beyond description. Unlike eliminative reductionism it must recognise the autonomy of higher level processes in any hierarchy or multiple levels of organised systems and unlike postmodern, cultural constructivists and genealogists it must recognise the legitimacy of tradition and tradition internal concerns. In the context of this debate, the lecture will discuss the two kinds of reductionism and the idea of ‘explanation’.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 1

15 Oct 2009

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the VedÅnta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 5

20 Nov 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 5

20 Nov 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 4

6 Nov 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 4

6 Nov 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 2

30 Oct 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 2

30 Oct 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 1

23 Oct 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 1

23 Oct 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 3

6 Nov 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 3

6 Nov 2008

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on Theology and Religious Studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the literature and fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in Theology and the Phenomenology of Religion. While the readings themselves are not directly about the Phenomenology of Religion, in order to understand the Phenomenology of Religion we need to address these fundamental ideas and to raise the basic questions of Phenomenology. The aim is not so much a comprehensive overview of the phenomenological movement, but rather an attempt to come to grips with key phenomenological ideas that influence Theology, the Phenomenology of Religion, and other areas in the human sciences. The series carries on from last year and will begin again with a reading from the ‘father of phenomenology’, Edmund Husserl’s The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology: An Introduction to Phenomenological Philosophy (Evanson: Northwestern University Press, 1970).

Related: 1

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 8

3 Dec 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 7

26 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 6

19 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 5

12 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 4

5 Nov 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 3

29 Oct 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

Hinduism I: Themes and textual sources Part 2

22 Oct 2008

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedānta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.

Related: 0

The importance of religion 3: Religion, text, and subjectivity

3 Nov 2008

A religious community is defined and adapts to present conditions by the way it reads or receives its sacred texts realised in the present in a ritual space and internalised within subjectivity. The self becomes an index of tradition and subjectivity is formed through repeated liturgical acts which are enactments or embodiments of the revelation or text (broadly defined and not restricted to written document). The lecture will explore the internalisation of the text through the ritual process as the expression or realisation of the religious imperative. The realisation of the text in present speech (and it can only be realised in the present here and now) is accompanied by the internalisation of the text in subjectivity and also by the externalisation of the text in ethics, art and politics: the religious imperative comes to be articulated through ethical behaviour defined by a community, artistic expression and political institution. The ritual space within which the text is realised and brought to life for a present speech community, along with the internalisation of text and tradition, is the site of transcendence as instantiated in the history of religions. In technical terms from Linguistic Anthropology this is the subordination of the ‘indexical-I’ to the ‘I’ contained within the text, the implied reader or ‘I of discourse’ (Urban ‘The ‘I’ of Discourse’). The self of religions is formed through revelation mediated by tradition and realised in specific acts of ‘reading’ or the reception of texts. The argument will be that the central aspect of the religious self is the internalisation of the text and the alignment with the narrative of one’s own life with the tradition. This is to see life as quest for meaning through the internalisation of tradition. This internalisation is also an orientation towards the future.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 7

18 Jun 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 7

18 Jun 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 6

11 Jun 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 6

11 Jun 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 5

4 Jun 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 5

4 Jun 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 4

28 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 4

28 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 3

21 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 3

21 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 2

14 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 2

14 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 1

7 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 1

7 May 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters.

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 7

18 Jun 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 7

18 Jun 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 6

11 Jun 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 6

11 Jun 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 5

4 Jun 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 5

4 Jun 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 1

7 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 1

7 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 2

14 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 2

14 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 3

21 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 3

21 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Readings in Phenomenology 4

28 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 0

Readings in Phenomenology 4

28 May 2009

Phenomenology is one of the most important developments in philosophy in the twentieth century that has had a deep impact on theology and religious studies. This seminar series seeks to engage with some of the fundamental concepts of phenomenology which underlie much work in theology and the phenomenology of religion

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 8: Monistic Saivism

11 May 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 8: Monistic Saivism

11 May 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 5: Bhakti literatures and ritual texts

18 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 5: Bhakti literatures and ritual texts

18 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 4: Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters

11 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 4: Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters

11 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 4: Bhakti and Yoga in the Bhagavad-gita and its interpreters

11 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 2

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 7: The Pancaratra

4 Mar 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 7: The Pancaratra

4 Mar 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 6: The Sant tradition: Kabir

25 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 6: The Sant tradition: Kabir

25 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 1: Introduction: the question of soteriology in India

21 Jan 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 3: Yoga-sutras of Patanjali

4 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 3: Yoga-sutras of Patanjali

4 Feb 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 2: The Samkhya and Yoga

28 Jan 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 0

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 2: The Samkhya and Yoga

28 Jan 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II: Hindu ideas of liberation Lecture 2: The Samkhya and Yoga

28 Jan 2009

These lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of ‘Hindu’ traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focusing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 2

The importance of religion Lecture 1: Religion and spirituality

23 Jan 2009

This series of lectures continues the series started in Michaelmas Term 2008.

Related: 0

The importance of religion Lecture 3: Religion and music

6 Feb 2009

This series of lectures continues the series started in Michaelmas Term 2008.

Related: 0

The importance of religion Lecture 2: Religion and literature

30 Jan 2009

This series of lectures continues the series started in Michaelmas Term 2008.

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 1

26 Jan 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 1

26 Jan 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 2

2 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 2

2 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 3

9 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 3

9 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 4

16 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).  

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 4

16 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).  

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 5

23 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).  

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 5

23 Feb 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).  

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 6

2 Mar 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 6

2 Mar 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 1

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 7

9 Mar 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 0

Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 7

9 Mar 2009

The Jayakhya-samhita is one of the three gems of the Pancaratra or tantric Vaishnavism. This early medieval text contains material on cosmology, ritual, and the construction of mantras. The seminar will focus on selected chapters. BibliographyGupta, S. The Laskmi Tantra (Delhi: MLBD, 2000 [1972]). Krishnamacharya, Embar (ed) The Jayakhyasamhita of the Pancaratra Agama (Baroda: Gaekwad Oriental Series, 1967).Matsubara, M. Pancaratra Samhitas and Early Vaisnava Theology (Delhi; MLBD, 1994).Shrader, Otto Introduction to the Pancaratra and the Ahirbudhnya Samhita (Adyar: Adyar Library, 1916).Smith, H.D. A Descriptive Bibliography of the printed Texts of the Pancaratragama 2 vols. (Baroda: Gawkwad Oriental Series, 1975 and 1980).

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 2

5 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeu's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 2

5 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeu's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 1

29 Jan 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88. 

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 1

29 Jan 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88. 

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 7

12 Mar 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 7

12 Mar 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 6

5 Mar 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 6

5 Mar 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 3

12 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1‚-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 3

12 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1‚-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 4

19 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 4

19 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 1

Readings in phenomenology 5

26 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 0

Readings in phenomenology 5

26 Feb 2009

This seminar series continues. This term we will focus on reading Paul Ricoeur's Tme and Narrative. This three volume work covers a great deal and raises questions about the nature of text, action, history, fiction, memory and the very nature of existence itself. These volumes provide a critical engagement with issues in historiography and theories of the text. BibliographyRicoeur, Paul Time and Narrative vols 1-2. Trans by Kathleen McLaughlin and David Pellauer, University of Chicago Press, 1984-88.

Related: 1

Theories of the text series (five lectures)

17 Oct 2006

The study of texts is fundamental to Theology and Religious Studies. The aim of this series of seminars is to examine some theories of the text that have arisen within the human sciences over the last fifty years and to examine their implications for the study of religions. These developments have broadly occurred within what has become known as the 'linguistic' turn and 'postmodernism', along with reactions to it. As we now move beyond these intellectual movements ('beyond theory' to borrow a recent term by Terry Eagleton) we need to reassess the role of the text, particularly the religious text, and examine the kinds of reading practices that are available to us.

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Hinduism I series: Themes and textual sources (eight lectures)

20 Oct 2005

This series of eigth lectures offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focussing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on both philosophical and social issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. Not only presenting an account of the texts and traditions, the course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. The last two lectures will examine contemporary traditions in Kerala and we will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity. Lecture ScheduleIntroduction: What is Hinduism?The Vedas and Vedic traditions.The Upanishads: the Chandogya and SvetashvataraDharma, society and genderTheistic Traditions 1Theistic Traditions 2Local Traditions: KeralaHinduism and Modernity

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Readings in Phenomenology 3

8 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 3

8 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 4

15 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 4

15 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 2

1 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 2

1 May 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 4

14 May 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 4

14 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 1

24 Apr 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 1

24 Apr 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 1

23 Apr 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 1

23 Apr 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 2

30 Apr 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 2

30 Apr 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 3

7 May 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya Samhita 3

7 May 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 5

21 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 5

21 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 6

28 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 6

28 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 7

6 Mar 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 7

6 Mar 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 1

17 Jan 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 4

14 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 4

14 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 4

13 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 4

13 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 7

5 Mar 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 7

5 Mar 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 3

7 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 3

7 Feb 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 2

31 Jan 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 2

31 Jan 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 1

24 Jan 2008
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Readings in Phenomenology 1

24 Jan 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 6

27 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 6

27 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 5

20 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 5

20 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 3

6 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 3

6 Feb 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 2

30 Jan 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 2

30 Jan 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 8

6 Mar 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 6

21 Feb 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 7

28 Feb 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 4

7 Feb 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 3

31 Jan 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 2

24 Jan 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 1

23 Jan 2008
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Readings in the Jayakhya-samhita 1

23 Jan 2008
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Hinduism II: Yoga, Bhakti, and Tantra: Part 5

14 Feb 2008
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Welcome Address

Shivdasani Conference 2007
20 Oct 2007

Session 1 of the 2007 Shivdasani Conference.

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Hinduism One, Part 6

15 Nov 2007
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Hinduism One, Part 7

29 Nov 2007
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Hinduism One, Part 5

8 Nov 2007
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Hinduism One, Part 3

25 Oct 2007
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Hinduism One, Part 2

18 Oct 2007
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Hinduism One, Part 1

11 Oct 2007
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Understanding the Pancaratra

30 Nov 2006

This seminar presented by the Prof. Narasimhachary (OCHS Shivdasani Fellow) and Prof. Gavin Flood (OCHS Academic Director) will explore issues of text and interpretation through focussing on texts of the Pancaratra corpus.

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Hinduism I series (eight lectures)

20 Oct 2006

This course offers a thematic and historical introduction to Hinduism for students of theology and religious studies. Focusing on the brahmanical tradition we will explore the textual sources, categories, practices and social institutions that formed that tradition. Primary texts in translation will provide the basis for reflection on issues such as dharma, renunciation, caste, and concepts of deity. We then move on to some of the major philosophical developments of the tradition, with particular emphasis on the Vedanta. The course will raise theological and cultural questions about the relation between reason and practice, person and world, and society and gender. We will conclude with a consideration of Hinduism and modernity.Lecture ScheduleIntroduction: What is Hinduism?The Veda and vedic traditions.Dharma, society and genderAscetic TraditionsIndian TheismPhilosophical Traditions 1Philosophical Traditions 2Hinduism and Modernity

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Theories of the text seminar series (four lectures)

25 Jan 2006

The study of texts is fundamental to Theology and Religious Studies. The aim of this series of seminars is to examine some theories of the text over the last fifty years that have arisen within the human sciences and to examine their implications for the study of religions. These developments have broadly occurred within what has become known as the linguistic turn and postmodernism along with reactions to it. As we now move beyond these intellectual movements (beyond theory to coin a recent term by Terry Eagleton) we need to reassess the role of the text, particularly the religious text, and examine the kinds of reading practices that are available to us.Questions concerning the nature of texts, the nature of reading, the importance of narrative, the relation of sign to symbol, the relation of text to author and of text to reader or community of readers are fundamental to any understanding of religion and culture. The seminars are therefore intended to provide a preliminary overview of developments within phenomenology, hermeneutics, semiotics and narratology. Because of the vast nature of the topic, these seminars can only hope to offer pointers in particular directions, raise questions about textuality, and encourage the raising of questions about the text within students‚particular fields of interest. Perhaps the most pervasive theme that the seminars will often return to concerns the question of the subject of the text which itself entails questions about agency and reception. Other questions might also be considered such as the implications of broadening the concept to text to include oral texts. Through examining questions shared by all scholars concerned with texts it is hoped that the cross fertilisation of ideas will facilitate new understandings and applications.Introduction: What is a text? What is a sacred text?Intention in the text: PhenomenologySign in the Text: Semiotics (and Deconstruction)The text in action: Social ScienceThe text in the reader: Theories of Reception

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Hinduism II lecture series: Yoga, bhakti, tantra (eight lectures)

25 Jan 2005

A series of eight lecturesThese lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of "Hindu" traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focussing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

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Hinduism II lecture series: Yoga, bhakti, tantra (eight lectures)

25 Jan 2005

A series of eight lecturesThese lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of "Hindu" traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focussing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

Related: 1

Hinduism II lecture series: Yoga, bhakti, tantra (eight lectures)

25 Jan 2005

A series of eight lecturesThese lectures will examine conceptions of liberation and paths leading to liberation in the history of "Hindu" traditions. After an introductory lecture that raises some of the theological questions about the relation of path to goal and the importance of ritual and asceticism in the history of Indian religions, we will begin with an examination of Samkhya, the philosophical backdrop of Yoga, and move on to the opening Yoga-sutras, their ideal of liberation as isolation (kaivalya), and the means of achieving that goal. We will trace the development of devotion (bhakti) and examine bhakti and yoga in the Bhagavad Gita before moving into the medieval period. Here the lectures will describe some developments of bhakti in vernacular literatures, focussing on both texts that advocate devotion to iconic forms and the later texts that advocate devotion to an absolute without qualities. Here we will also examine the importance of ritual texts and the relation between ritual, devotion and yoga. Lastly we will trace the themes of liberation and path with examples from selected tantric traditions within Vaisnavism and Saivism. While the lectures will place texts in their historical contexts, the course will not examine texts in a strictly chronological sequence, the stress being on theme. Throughout we will raise critical theological questions through engaging with texts in translation and raise the question about the extent to which liberation is a rhetoric that overlays other cultural forces. By the end of the course the student should have an understanding of soteriology in Hindu traditions, an understanding of some the main literatures associated with this, and an awareness of the philosophical and theological problems entailed. These lectures are aimed at students of theology and religious studies.

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Experience and tradition in Hindu tantra

Majewski Lecture
23 May 2003
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Readings in the Netra Tantra: Week Two

2 May 2013
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Readings in the Netra Tantra: Week Three

9 May 2013
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Readings in the Netra Tantra: Week Four

16 May 2013
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Readings in the Netra Tantra: Week One

25 Apr 2013
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